ANCAP Ratings - What do they mean?


We hear of ANCAP Safety floating around in the conversations we have, but what exactly does it mean? Since 2018, the Australasian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP) has been testing cars against 4 different criteria, including: Adult Occupant Protection, Vulnerable Road User Protection and Safety Assist. They aim to indicate the level of safety a vehicle provides for occupants and pedestrians in the event of a crash. It further evaluates the likeliness of the technology in the car to be able to avoid or minimise an accident. Cars are rated from 1 to 5 in terms of safety, with a 5-star rating considered to be the best. The rating awarded is based on a vehicles performance in crash tests conducted by ANCAP. These tests are focused on simulating real-world situations and are executed in specially built facilities. The four categories are described in more detail as per the ANCAP website below:
  1. Adult Occupant Protection: considers the level of protection offered by the vehicle to adult occupants seated in the front and second row in the most common types of serious injury crashes
  2. Child Occupant Protection: Evaluates the level of protection the vehicle offers to child occupants seated in appropriate child restraints in the rear seats. The ability to effectively accommodate a range of child restraints is also assessed.
  3. Vulnerable Road User Protection: Assesses the design of the front of the vehicle to minimise injury risk to a struck pedestrian. Vehicles are also assessed for their ability to actively avoid or mitigate impacts with pedestrians and cyclists.
  4. Safety Assist: Evaluates the presence and effectiveness of active safety technologies fitted to the vehicle which assist the driver in preventing or minimising the effects of a crash.
These ratings have now become a primary factor when deciding which vehicle to purchase. They allow the public to make an educated decision on the safety of a car without any bias from manufacturers. ANCAP’s reviews now encourage continuous improvement by the vehicle brands, to meet a standard of safety for the driver and the public. When reading the rating, ensure to note the date stamp. This will share information for which year the car was tested. To achieve the maximum 5-Star ANCAP safety rating, a vehicle must reach the highest standards in all tests and feature advanced safety assist technologies. Using a car with a lower rating may indicate a risk to the car occupants and the public if an accident were to occur. ANCAP’s independent assessments have helped provide accurate vehicle safety information to not only new car buyers but also manufacturers. Through ANCAP’s findings, car manufacturers continue to make improvements and have managed to create vehicles that are much safer for not just the driver but also for the public. Click on the following link to check the ANCAP rating for the car you currently drive or are planning on purchasing: https://www.ancap.com.au/ 

Read More Comments

NSW Lockdown Restrictions for Driving


NSW is currently under a lockdown until the 30th of July 2021. With tight restrictions set in place to effectively reduce Covid-19 spread and exposure, many have raised the question regarding driving lessons.

At this point in time, driving lessons are unable to go ahead according to the health order that prohibits carpooling/travelling by car under any circumstance. Our team had a conversation with Service NSW in detail, and as per their recommendation have paused services until 30th July. This means no driving lessons will go ahead until the NSW government permits.

Driving tests in the Greater Sydney Area (inclusive of Blue Mountains, Shellharbour, Central Coast and Wollongong) have been suspended at least until 30th July. Anyone that had a test booked in this period will need to have it rescheduled. Please contact Service NSW 13 77 88 to receive more information regarding your driving test. 


Read More Comments

Driving on Rural Roads


Here in Australia, we are so fortunate to be surrounded by such beautiful rural towns that have an abundance to offer. So, it comes as no surprise that many families and travellers find themselves frequenting to these places throughout the year. However, rural road fatalities make up two thirds of our national road toll. Research conducted by Australian Road Safety Foundation (ARSF) shows that at least 71% of drivers from the metro and regional areas admit to driving dangerously on rural roads. Drivers who normally reside in metropolitan areas may misjudge the environment of the rural roads, which can lead to an error in their speed or reaction time causing a fatal accident.                                                         With faster road limits compared to metropolitan streets, fatigue can have a detrimental effect. A driver who has been awake for 17 hours is known to have the same reaction time as someone with a BAC reading of 0.05g/100ml, doubling their risk of being involved in an accident. While driving at a speed of 100km/hr, if the driver nods off to sleep for even just 3 seconds, the car would have travelled over 80 meters without any control. Regardless of driver experience, vigilance is crucial when driving in these rural areas due to the wildlife that resides surrounding the roads. What are the Signs of Fatigue?
Various symptoms can present when experiencing tiredness, the following are just some signs you are experiencing fatigue:
  • Heavy or sore eyes
  • Inability to focus or loss of concentration
  • Impatience
  • Yawning
  • Irregular speed
If you think you are experiencing fatigue, the safest and most effective way to overcome this is to pull over to the side of the road and take a break. It is strongly recommended that for every 2 hours of driving, you take a 15-minute break.  Just by taking a break when you feel fatigued, you could be saving the lives of not just you and your loved ones, but also other road users.

Read More Comments

Speed Limits in Australia


In Australia, we have various speed limits depending on the type of road and level of pedestrian activity. The maximum legal speed a car can travel at is 130km/hour, which exists in a section of a highway in the Northern Territory.

Speed is the number one killer on Australian roads. Most drivers believe the speed limit is the recommended speed to drive, but in fact, the speed limit refers to the maximum speed a car can legally drive on that section of the road. Speeding not only increases the risk of the crash but also the severity of the outcome.

The car’s ability to stop varies on the speed they are travelling. Find below a table showing the time it takes for the car to stop – if the brakes have been used correctly – to come to a complete halt.


Read More Comments

Long Drives


A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN JUNE

Long Drives

— By Kashish Christian

As we inch closer to returning to normal in our travels, road safety is perhaps a topic that needs to be revised. With many offices now moving offsite, work from home has become a large part of our community. Paired with the travel bans and restrictions we’ve faced over the last year or so, driving has become a distant routine activity for many.


Read More Comments

The Essential Safety Guide for Learners

Written by Rebecca Saunders

the

essential safety guide for learners

There are a number of Road safety topics and Driving tips that are an essential guide to assist Learners on the road; with that being said Onroad Driving Education has over 40 knowledgeable and dedicated driver trainers and a select few have shared informative topics in their own opinion that motorists can also benefit from:


Read More Comments

What is the difference between defensive and low risk driving?


DEFENSIVE vs. low risk driving.

— By Kashish Christian

Road safety is a crucial aspect of any driver’s repertoire. As a driver, you are responsible for yourself, those in your car, the cars driving around you and pedestrians using the foot paths and crossings. Defensive and low risk driving are two important factors of being a safe and responsible driver. 


Read More Comments

Modified Driving and OT Assessments

Written by Rebecca Saunders

Modified Driving and OT Assessments

Onroad Driving School is an NDIS registered provider. We supply vehicle modifications and Occupational Therapy Assessments to participants with the support of Modified Driving Solutions.

Rebecca Saunders


Read More Comments

Supervising a Learner Driver

Written by Rebecca Saunders

Supervising a learner

by Rebecca Saunders

It is essential that Supervising Drivers consider the important skills and requirements needed to Instruct a Learner Driver. Helping someone to learn to drive is a serious responsibility and it's necessary to ensure the Learners safety.


Read More Comments

L.A.M.S - What Does This Mean?

Written by Rebecca Saunders

L.A.M.S - What does this mean?

Rebecca Saunders

In preparation for driving it is essential that motorists are aware of the L.A.M.S principles and apply them before beginning their journey by positioning themselves comfortably and safely inside the vehicle.


Read More Comments
Back to Top